The Number Six

The next number is Six.

scan0001six Six Counties the counties of Northern Ireland, Antrim, Armagh, Down, Londonderry, Tyrone, and Fermanagh, which by the Treaty of 1920 were constituted as a separate province.
Six Day War a war, 5–10 June 1967, in which Israel occupied Sinai, the Old City of Jerusalem, the West Bank, and the Golan Heights and defeated an Egyptian, Jordanian, and Syrian alliance. Arab name June War.
six hours’ sleep for a man, seven for a woman, and eight for a fool proverbial saying, early 17th century, implying that the more sleep a person needs, the less vigorous and effective they are likely to be. (In the late 20th century, it was widely reported that Margaret Thatcher when British Prime Minister habitually slept for only four hours a night.)
six of one and half a dozen of the other a traditional saying, mid 19th century; meaning that there is little or nothing to choose between two sides. (Encyclopedia.com)

Multiplication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50 100 1000
6 \times x 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72 78 84 90 96 102 108 114 120 126 132 138 144 150 300 600 6000
Division 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
6 \div x 6 3 2 1.5 1.2 1 0.\overline{85714}\overline{2} 0.75 0.\overline{6} 0.6 0.\overline{5}\overline{4} 0.5 0.\overline{46153}\overline{8} 0.\overline{42857}\overline{1} 0.4
x \div 6 0.1\overline{6} 0.\overline{3} 0.5 0.\overline{6} 0.8\overline{3} 1 1.1\overline{6} 1.\overline{3} 1.5 1.\overline{6} 1.8\overline{3} 2 2.1\overline{6} 2.\overline{3} 2.5
Exponentiation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
6 ^ x\, 6 36 216 1296 7776 46656 279936 1679616 10077696 60466176 362797056 2176782336 13060694016
x ^ 6\, 1 64 729 4096 15625 46656 117649 262144 531441 1000000 1771561 2985984 4826809

 

6
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Cardinal six
Ordinal 6th
(sixth)
Numeral system senary
Factorization 2 × 3
Divisors 1, 2, 3, 6
Roman numeral VI
Roman numeral (unicode) Ⅵ, ⅵ, ↅ
Greek prefix hexa-/hex-
Latin prefix sexa-/sex-
Binary 1102
Ternary 203
Quaternary 124
Quinary 115
Senary 106
Octal 68
Duodecimal 612
Hexadecimal 616
Vigesimal 620
Base 36 636
Greek στ (or ΣΤ or ς)
Arabic ٦
Persian ۶
Urdu ۶
Amharic
Bengali
Chinese numeral 六,陆
Devanāgarī
Hebrew ו (Vav)
Khmer
Thai
Telugu
Tamil
Saraiki ٦

The Number Five

The next number is Five.

scan0013Five five-and-dime in North America, a shop selling a wide variety of inexpensive household and personal goods (originally, a shop where all the articles were priced at five or ten cents).
five-finger exercise an easy task (literally, an exercise on the piano for all the fingers on both hands).
five Ks in Sikh belief, five signs, kangha (comb), kara (steel bangle), kesh (uncut hair, covered by a turban, and beard), kirpan (short sword) and kuccha (short trousers, originally for riding) which show allegiance to the Khalsa.
Five Members the members of the Long Parliament, Pym, Hampden, Haselrig, Holles, and Strode, whose arrest was unsuccessfully attempted by Charles I on 4 January 1642 in the House of Commons; having been warned in advance, they had escaped. The event contributed materially to the final break between king and Parliament.
five o’clock shadow a dark appearance on a man’s chin and face caused by the slight growth of beard that has occurred since he shaved in the morning.
Five Pillars of Islam the five duties expected of every Muslim—profession of the faith in a prescribed form, observance of ritual prayer, giving alms to the poor, fasting during the month of Ramadan, and performing a pilgrimage to Mecca.
five senses the faculties of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. (Encyclopedia.com)

5
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Cardinal five
Ordinal 5th
(fifth)
Numeral system quinary
Factorization prime
Divisors 1, 5
Roman numeral V
Roman numeral (unicode) Ⅴ, ⅴ
Greek prefix penta-/pent-
Latin prefix quinque-/quinqu-/quint-
Binary 1012
Ternary 123
Quaternary 114
Quinary 105
Senary 56
Octal 58
Duodecimal 512
Hexadecimal 516
Vigesimal 520
Base 36 536
Greek ε (or Ε)
Arabic ٥,5
Persian ۵
Urdu ۵
Ge’ez
Bengali
Kannada
Punjabi
Chinese numeral 五,伍
Korean 다섯,오
Devanāgarī ५ (panch)
Hebrew ה (Hey)
Khmer
Telugu
Malayalam
Tamil

The Number 4

The next number is Four.

scan0012Four four-colour problem a mathematical problem to prove that any plane map can be coloured with only four colours so that no two same-coloured regions have a common boundary.
four eyes see more than two two people are more observant than one alone (compare two heads are better than one). The saying is recorded from the late 16th century.
four freedoms the four essential human freedoms as proclaimed in a speech to Congress by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.
Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse War, Famine, Death, and Pestilence; they are traditionally identified with the riders of the white, red, black, and pale horses seen in Revelation.
four last things in Christian belief, death, judgement, heaven, and hell, as studied in eschatology.
four-letter word any of several short words referring to sexual or excretory functions, regarded as coarse or offensive; the term is recorded from the 1920s.
four noble truths the four central beliefs containing the essence of Buddhist teaching; they are that human life is characterized by frustration and suffering, that the cause of this is desire and greed, that desire must therefore be got rid of, and that following the eightfold path is the way to achieve this. (Encyclopedia.com)

Multiplication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50 100 1000
4 \times x 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 100 200 400 4000
Division 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
4 \div x 4 2 1.\overline{3} 1 0.8 0.\overline{6} 0.\overline{571428} 0.5 0.\overline{4} 0.4 0.\overline{36} 0.\overline{3} 0.\overline{307692} 0.\overline{285714} 0.2\overline{6} 0.25
x \div 4 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 1.25 1.5 1.75 2 2.25 2.5 2.75 3 3.25 3.5 3.75 4
Exponentiation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
4 ^ x\, 4 16 64 256 1024 4096 16384 65536 262144 1048576 4194304 16777216 67108864
x ^ 4\, 1 16 81 256 625 1296 2401 4096 6561 10000 14641 20736 28561

Grand Canyon Composite

I got a request for a Grand canyon with a Western theme. I failed on the “Western” account, but I think the end result looks good.

Grand Canyon Composite finalHope you like it.

Like, comment, give me more ideas, etc.

Links to files used in the composite:

Grand Canyon

A piece of this.

Eagle

Train

Words on sign

Post

Sign

Horse

Waterfall part 1

Waterfall part 2

Waterfall part 3

Rocks at bottom of post

I will post a short video tutorial on how to crop out a waterfall soon, (by Thanksgiving….).

The Number 3

The next number is Three.

scan0011Three three acres and a cow regarded as the requirement for self-sufficiency; as a political slogan associated with the radical politician Jesse Collings (1831–1920) and his land reform campaign begun in 1885. Collings used the phrase in the House of Commons, 26 January 1886; it had also been used earlier by Joseph Chamberlain.
Three Graces in classical Greek mythology, three beautiful goddesses (Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne), daughters of Zeus. They were believed to personify and bestow charm, grace, and beauty.
Three Kings the Magi, who came from the East to worship the new-born Christ. They are also known as The Three Kings of Cologne, from a prevalent belief that their bodies were preserved at that city, having been removed thither in 1164 from Milan, where they were alleged to have been discovered in 1158.
three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead proverbial saying, mid 16th century; meaning that the only way to keep a secret is to tell no-one else.
Three Mile Island an island in the Susquehanna River near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, site of a nuclear power station. In 1979 an accident caused damage to the reactor core, provoking strong reactions against the nuclear industry in the US.
three-mile limit the limit of territorial waters for Britain, America, and other states.
Three Musketeers in Dumas’ novel Les Trois Mousquetaires (1844), Athos, Porthos, and Aramis befriend the young D’Artagnan, and assist him in defeating the scheming agent of Cardinal Richelieu; in extended use, the phrase means three close associates.
three R’s reading, (w)riting, and (a)rithmetic; a phrase said to have originated in a toast by Sir William Curtis (1752–1829).
three removals are as bad as a fire proverbial saying, mid 18th century; meaning that moving house is so disruptive and unsettling, that the effects of doing it three times are as destructive as a house fire.
three sheets in the wind very drunk; a sheet is a rope or chain attached to the lower corner of a sail for securing the sail or altering its direction relative to the wind.
three strikes (and you’re out) legislation which provides that an offender’s third felony is punishable by life imprisonment or other severe sentence, a phrase which developed in the US in the 1980s, and which comes from the terminology of baseball, in which a batter who has had three strikes, or three fair opportunities of hitting the ball, is out.
three things are not to be trusted; a cow’s horn, a dog’s tooth, and a horse’s hoof proverbial saying, late 14th century; meaning that one may be gored, bitten, or kicked without warning.
Three Wise Men another name for the Magi. (Encyclopedia.com)

Multiplication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50 100 1000
3 \times x 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 150 300 3000
Division 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
3 \div x 3 1.5 1 0.75 0.6 0.5 0.\overline{428571} 0.375 0.\overline{3} 0.3 0.\overline{27} 0.25 0.\overline{230769} 0.2\overline{142857} 0.2
x \div 3 0.\overline{3} 0.\overline{6} 1 1.\overline{3} 1.\overline{6} 2 2.\overline{3} 2.\overline{6} 3 3.\overline{3} 3.\overline{6} 4 4.\overline{3} 4.\overline{6} 5
Exponentiation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
3 ^ x\, 3 9 27 81 243 729 2187 6561 19683 59049 177147 531441 1594323
x ^ 3\, 1 8 27 64 125 216 343 512 729 1000 1331 1728 2197

The Number 2

The second number is 2.

2_for_PostTwo recorded from Old English (in form twā) and of Germanic origin, the word comes ultimately from an Indo-European root shared by Latin and Greek duo.
if two ride on a horse, one must ride behind proverbial saying, late 16th century; meaning that of two people engaged on the same task, one must take a subordinate role.
it takes two to make a bargain proverbial saying, late 16th century, often used to imply that both parties must be prepared to give some ground. (Compare it takes two to tango below.)
it takes two to make a quarrel proverbial saying, early 18th century, meaning that some responsibility for a disagreement rests with each party to it.
it takes two to tango proverbial saying, mid 20th century, meaning that a cooperative venture requires a contribution from both participants.
there are two sides to every question proverbial saying, early 19th century, meaning that a problem can be seen from more than one angle. In classical Greek, Diogenes Laertius records of the Greek sophist Protagoras (b. c.485 bc) that, ‘Protagoras was the first to say that there are two sides to every question, one opposed to the other.’
two blacks don’t make a white proverbial saying, early 18th century, meaning that one injury or instance of wrongdoing does not justify another. (Compare two wrongs don’t make a right.)
two cultures literature and science as disciplines that tend to be mutually incompatible or hostile; the term was coined by the novelist and scientist C. P. Snow (1905–80) in ‘The two cultures and the scientific revolution’, title of The Rede Lecture given at Cambridge in 1959.
two heads are better than one proverbial saying, late 14th century, meaning that it is advisable to discuss a problem with another person. (Compare four eyes see more than two.)
two is company, but three is none proverbial saying, early 18th century; often used with the alternative ending ‘three’s a crowd.’
two-minute silence observed on the anniversary of Armistice Day (11 November 1918), or on Remembrance Sunday; The Times of 12 November 1919 recorded that ‘At 11 o’clock yesterday morning the nation, in response to the King’s invitation, paid homage to the Glorious Dead by keeping a two minutes’ silence.’ (Later sources refer to a silence of two minutes’ duration having been observed by Canadian railways and churches in memory of those Canadians who drowned in the Titanic disaster of 1912, but contemporary use of the phrase is not recorded.)
two nations the rich and poor members of a society seen as effectively divided into separate nations by the presence or absence of wealth; the phrase comes from Disraeli’s novel Sybil (1845), and has given rise to the expression One Nation.
two of a trade never agree proverbial saying, early 17th century; meaning that close association with someone makes disagreement over policy and principles more likely.
Two Sicilies the former kingdom of Naples and Sicily. Originally a single state uniting the southern peninsula of Italy with Sicily, it was divided in the 13th century between the Angevin dynasty on the mainland territory and the Aragonese dynasty on the island; both claimed title to the kingdom of Sicily. In the mid 15th century the state was reunited under Alfonso V of Aragon, who took the title ‘rex Utriusque Siciliae [king of the Two Sicilies]’.
two wrongs don’t make a right proverbial saying, late 18th century, meaning that a first injury does not justify a second in retaliation. (Compare two blacks don’t make a white.)
while two dogs are fighting for a bone, a third runs away with it proverbial saying, late 14th century, meaning that while the attention of the disputants is on their quarrel, both may lose possession of what they are fighting over to a third party. (Encyclopedia.com)

Multiplication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50 100 1000
2 \times x 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 100 200 2000
Division 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
2 \div x 2 1 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.285714 0.25 0.2 0.2 0.18 0.16 0.153846 0.142857 0.13
x \div 2 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5
Exponentiation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
2 ^ x\, 2 4 8 16 32 64 128 256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192 16384
x ^ 2\, 1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81 100 121 144 169 196

The Number 1

Welcome to the Numbers! We start with One.

1_for_PostOne one for sorrow; two for mirth; three for a wedding, four for a birth proverbial saying, mid 19th century, referring to the number of magpies seen at the same time.
one for the mouse, one for the crow, one to rot, one to grow proverbial saying, mid 19th century, traditionally used when sowing seed, and enumerating the ways in which some of the crop will be lost leaving a proportion to germinate.
one nail drives out another proverbial saying, mid 13th century, meaning like will counter like (compare fight fire with fire). The same idea is found in ancient Greek in Aristotle‘s Politics, ‘one nail knocks out another, according to the proverb.’
One Nation a nation not divided by social inequality; in Britain in the 1990s, especially regarded as the objective of a branch of or movement within the Conservative Party, seen as originating in the paternalistic form of Toryism advocated by Benjamin Disraeli.

In 1950 a group of Conservative MPs, then in opposition, published under the title One Nation a pamphlet asserting their view of the necessity of greater commitment by their party to the social services; these ideas had great influence when the party returned to government in the following year.

In the 1990s, One Nation returned to prominence in the debate between the right and left wings of the Conservative Party on the effect of the Thatcherite policies of the 1980s.
one size does not fit all an assertion of individual requirements; the saying is recorded from the early 17th century. Earlier versions of it exist, and are based on the metaphor of different size shoes for different feet, e.g. from J. Bridges Defence of the Government of the Church of England (1587), ‘Diverse feet have diverse lastes. The shooe that will serve one, may wring another.’
the one that got away traditional angler’s description of a large fish that just eluded capture, from the comment ‘you should have seen the one that got away.’
one year’s seeding makes seven years’ weeding proverbial saying, late 19th century; the allusion is to the danger of allowing weeds to grow and seed themselves.
when one door shuts, another opens proverbial saying, late 16th century, meaning that as one possible course of action is closed off, another opportunity offers. (Encyclopedia.com)

Table of basic calculations

Multiplication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50 100 1000
1 \times x 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 50 100 1000
Division 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
1 \div x 1 0.5 0.3 0.25 0.2 0.16 0.142857 0.125 0.1 0.1 0.09 0.083 0.076923 0.0714285 0.06
x \div 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Exponentiation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
1 ^ x\, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
x ^ 1\, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

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